Louis M. Kunkel, PhD

Professor of Pediatrics and Genetics, Harvard Medical School
Dr. Kunkel is an internationally recognized geneticist with years of experience and scientific success in the understanding of the basis for muscular dystrophies. He received a B.A. from Gettysburg College and his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University. Over the past three decades Dr. Kunkel has devoted his career to understanding the molecular basis, and developing therapy, for neuromuscular disorders. Dr. Kunkel is universally recognized for the discovery of the genes responsible for muscular dystrophy and other neuromuscular disorders. He has been involved in the identification of genes altered to cause muscular dystrophy since his 1986 identification of dystrophin as the causative gene in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.  His current work centers on developing dystrophin independent therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy to complement existing therapies currently in development. A past Howard Hughes investigator and member of the National Academy of Sciences, Dr. Kunkel received the 2009 March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology for this pioneering work on muscular dystrophy. He leads a long-standing effort to develop novel therapies.

Dr. Kunkel currently is a member of the Division of Genetics and Genomics at Boston Children’s Hospital; and Professor of Pediatrics and Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston. He is also Director of the Sequencing/Genotyping, Expression Array and FACS Sorting Core Facilities at Children’s Hospital Boston.

About Claritas

Claritas Genomics serves children affected with complex genetic disorders by providing timely and accurate results, resolving families’ long search for answers. By combining clinical expertise of the world’s best pediatric specialists with innovative platform solutions, Claritas is working to improve patient care and enable new discoveries. We are committed to the highest quality and accessibility of information and our interpretive services and unique approach to reporting set the standard for reliably and clearly communicating genetic information.

Now is the time to integrate genomics into clinical practice to inform, guide and improve medical treatment for kids around the world.